social

Forbidden Knowledge

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
10
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

This is the industrial strength version of Compartmentalization of Knowledge anti-pattern.  This occurs when knowing or pursuing some knowledge is actually denied to a certain group of people under the threat of penalty, as when the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) being told they can't study guns as a "Public health issue."

Opacity

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
11
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

Sometimes information is kept secret from citizens.  This is useful when hiding corruption, money laundering, vote buying, tax evasion, etc.  With opacity in place, over the years elite business and governments can distance themselves further and further away from any controls on them.

Hidden Agendas

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
12
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

Society expects its leaders to keep their agendas transparent and in line with the agenda of the groups they represent, however, this is rarely the case.  Those in power often have agendas that aren't in line with the public's expectations of them, and for this reason they may choose to keep these agendas hidden.

Corruption and Fraud

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
13
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

Corruption and fraud are, in this context, when an entity in power does things that are dishonest or contrary to commonly accepted ethics and laws.  This generally involves bribes or intimidation behind the scene.  Profit and power are usually the driving force behind such actions.  Go figure.

Social Darwinism

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
14
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

Some people are just weaker than others and have less power or opportunity to take power.  The idea of Social Darwinism is that it is natural that these people fail, and that society shouldn't feel responsible for taking care of these people.  Basically, it's a dog eat dog world.

Denialism

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
15
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

This is the adherence to certain beliefs proven to be untrue -- or refusing to accept as truth something that has been proven to be true.  Denialism can be motivated by religious beliefs, self-interest, or as a defense mechanism out of fear or discomfort.  Inculcating knee-jerk distrust for particular people or groups is often a useful part of denialism.

Eye for an Eye - Retribution

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
16
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

Equivalent exchange by way of exact behavior.  This is the idea that, "doing unto others the same as has been done unto you," is the true balance of justice.  This approach, diligently adhered to, motivates a perpetual cycle of violence.  An eye for an eye doesn't leave the whole world blind, just people who go around poking out other people's eyes!

Cultural Imperialism

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
17
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

This is the way in which powerful cultures present their culture as the most acceptable lifestyle, and condemn the cultural practices of others.  Some cultural nuances are acceptable, but if it contradicts the values of the dominant culture, those ideals must be eliminated.

Ultra-nationalism

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
18
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

This is the belief that your country of choice is bar none, hands down, the best country in the world.  No other country comes close and your country's interests are more important than all other country's interests...combined.  Without the violence and intimidation that accompanies this anti-pattern, the people and groups who employ it would seem a lot more humorous.

Education, Inc.

Pattern number within this pattern set: 
19
Version: 
3
Verbiage for pattern card: 

The Privatization of education helps reverse the idea of high quality free education that potentially undergirds a truly democratic way of life.  Privatizing education can reinforce the division of society into haves and have-nots.  It can support elite instruction on the one hand and cheap, possibly online training on the other augmented of course with a non-stop barrage of standardized testing.  It can erode the role of dedicated teachers and substitute with business goals and software.

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